Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

West-Indianischer Historien Ander Theil

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Article ID DKS0819
Artist Bry, de (1528-1598)
Theodorus de Bry (1528-1598) Frankfurt a.M. Around 1570, Theodorus de Bry, a Protestant, fled religious persecution south to Strasbourg, along the west bank of the Rhine. In 1577, he moved to Antwerp in the Duchy of Brabant, which was part of the Spanish Netherlands or Southern Netherlands and Low Countries of that time (16th Century), where he further developed and used his skills as a copper engraver. Between 1585 and 1588 he lived in London, where he met the geographer Richard Hakluyt and began to collect stories and illustrations of various European explorations, most notably from Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues. Depiction of Spanish atrocities in the New World, as recounted by Bartolome de las Casas in Narratio Regionum indicarum per Hispanos Quosdam devastatarum verissima. In 1588, Theodorus and his family moved permanently to Frankfurt-am-Main, where he became citizen and began to plan his first publications. The most famous one is known as Les Grands Voyages, i.e., The Great Travels, or The Discovery of America. He also published the largely identical India Orientalis-series, as well as many other illustrated works on a wide range of subjects. His books were published in Latin, and were also translated into German, English and French to reach a wider reading public.
Title West-Indianischer Historien Ander Theil
Year ca. 1594
Description Sea gods on the high seas (Magellanic Sea). Theodor De Bry after John White.A water deity is a deity in mythology associated with water or various bodies of water. Water deities are common in mythology and were usually more important among civilizations in which the sea or ocean, or a great river was more important. Another important focus of worship of water deities has been springs or holy wells. As a form of animal worship, whales and snakes (hence dragons) have been regarded as godly deities throughout the world (other animals are such as turtles, fish, crabs, and sharks). In Asian lore, whales and dragons sometimes have connections. Serpents are also common as a symbol or as serpentine deities, sharing many similarities with dragons.
The origin of sea monster myths is mostly unknown. However, there is a large number of written traditions, mostly by seafarers, in which encounters with supposed sea monsters are described. In 1555, the Swedish clergyman Olaus Magnus depicted numerous sea monsters in words and pictures in his works Carta Marina and Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus, whose descriptions were adopted by later authors.
Place of Publication Frankfurt on Main
Dimensions (cm)26 x 19,5 cm
ConditionPerfect condition
Coloringcolored
TechniqueCopper print

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