Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Vue de San Francisco

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Article ID AMU1491
Artist Le Breton (1818-1866)
LeBreton was a French painter who took part in several voyages of exploration as a ship's doctor and produced a series of lithographs depicting ships, seascapes, harbours and cultural details.
Title Vue de San Francisco
Year ca. 1850
Description Splendid general view of San Francisco with sailing ships in front. Foreground partly qouached. After the original drawing by Louis Le Breton.
Originally, San Francisco Bay was settled by the Muwekma Ohlone Indian tribe. The Spanish conquistadors sent two expeditions to the north of America in the 16th century to explore the west coast. Hernán Cortés had discovered a "peninsula between the Gulf and the ocean" and named it California. But the official discovery did not occur until ten years later with Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo. The elusive entrance to the bay was not discovered until 1775, although many explorers, including Francis Drake, explored the region as early as the 16th century. The first Europeans settled in the present city beginning in 1776, a century later. Spanish soldiers and missionaries founded what is now Mission Dolores Church on June 29 at a lagoon they named Nuestra Señora de los Dolores, as well as a presidio at Golden Gate to secure the mission. The town was later named San Francisco de Asís by the missionaries in memory of Saint Francis of Assisi, and in English it became Saint Francis. In 1792, 300 years after the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, the British explorer George Vancouver founded a small settlement near Yerba Buena (later downtown San Francisco). It became a base for European and Russian settlers, fur traders and pioneers.
Place of Publication France
Dimensions (cm)31,5 x 48,5 cm
ConditionMargins mounted
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueLithography

Reproduction:

390.00 €

( A reproduction can be ordered individually on request. )