Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Von stetten Mauritanie. / von den Löwen und ihrer natur.

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Article ID AF0485
Artist Münster (1489-1552)
Sebastian Münster (1488 – 1552) belongs to the very important Comographers of the Renaicance. He issued his first famous Cosmographia in 1544 with 24 double paged maps with German description of the world. It had numerous editions in different languages including Latin, French, Italian, English, and Czech. The last German edition was published in 1628, long after his death. The Cosmographia was one of the most successful and popular books of the 16th century. It passed through 24 editions in 100 years. This success was due to the notable woodcuts , some by Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Deutsch, and David Kandel. It was most important in reviving geography in 16th-century Europe. His first geographic works were Germania descriptio (1530) and Mappa Europae (1536). In 1540 he published a Latin edition of Ptolemy's Geographia with illustrations. The 1550 edition contains cities, portraits, and costumes. These editions, printed in Germany, are the most valued of the Cosmographias.
Title Von stetten Mauritanie. / von den Löwen und ihrer natur.
Year ca. 1550
Description The front shows one of the four cities of Mauritania: "Jol, Cirta, Arsenaria, Catenna".
Above are the columns of Heracles.
The back shows a lion in Africa.
From the late 19th century, France claimed the areas of what is now Mauretania from Senegal to the north. In 1901, Xavier Coppolani took over the imperial mission. Through a combination of strategic alliances with Zawaya tribes and military pressure on the Hassane warrior nomads, he managed to expand French rule over the Mauritanian Emirates. Trarza, Brakna and Tagant were occupied by the French armies in 1903–04, but the northern Emirate of Adrar held out longer, aided by the anti-colonial uprising (or jihad) by Shaykh Maa al-Aynayn and insurgents from Tagant and the other regions. Adrar was finally defeated militarily in 1912 and incorporated into the Mauritanian territory, which had been created and planned in 1904. Mauritania belonged to French West Africa from 1920 as a protectorate and then as a colony.
Place of Publication Basle
Dimensions (cm)25,5 x 17 cm
ConditionPerfect condition
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueWoodcut

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