Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

View of Toulon.

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Article ID EUF4665
Artist Medland
Title View of Toulon.
Year c. 1799
Description Decorative view of the French city of Toulon with sailing ships in front.
The coastal region around Toulon has been inhabited by people since at least the Paleolithic Age, as findings in the Henry Cosquer Cave have shown. Since about the 7th century BC, trading settlements existed on the coast, founded by Greek seafarers from Asia Minor. From about the 4th century BC, Celts can be traced in the area. In the 2nd century BC Roman troops occupied the coastal region and founded the port city of Telo Martius, named possibly after a Ligurian goddess "Telo" . In ancient times Telo Martius was known as a center for the production of purple. Towards the end of the Roman Empire, the town and region were Christianized. In the early Middle Ages, the city was repeatedly subjected to attacks by Saracens and pirates. After the annexation of Provence to France in 1486, Toulon was gradually developed into a military port. In particular, under Louis XIV's minister Jean-Baptiste Colbert, the fortifications and port facilities were expanded according to plans by Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban. During the War of the Spanish Succession, the city was unsuccessfully besieged by coalition troops in 1707. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Toulon was the starting point for various French naval operations in the Mediterranean. On February 22, 1744, the naval battle of Toulon took place during the War of the Austrian Succession. In ancient times, Telo Martius was known as a center for the production of purple. Towards the end of the Roman Empire, the town and region were Christianized. In the early Middle Ages the town was repeatedly exposed to attacks by Saracens and pirates. After the annexation of Provence to France in 1486, Toulon was gradually developed into a military port. In particular, under Louis XIV's minister Jean-Baptiste Colbert, the fortifications and port facilities were expanded according to plans by Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban. During the War of the Spanish Succession, the city was unsuccessfully besieged by coalition troops in 1707. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Toulon was the starting point for various French naval operations in the Mediterranean. On February 22, 1744, the naval battle of Toulon took place during the War of the Austrian Succession. This was the first time Napoleon Bonaparte played an important military role. The capture of the city was followed by a bloody punitive regime by the Jacobins. On May 19, 1798, Napoleon and his army set out from Toulon for the Egyptian Expedition.
Place of Publication London
Dimensions (cm)12,5 x 22 cm
Conditionlittle stains
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueCopper print- Aquatinta

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