Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Moraviae Qua Olim Marcomannorum Sedes, Corographia , A.D.Paulo Fabritio Medico et Mathematico Descripta….

  • Translation

Article ID EUT1015
Artist Ortelius (1527-1598)
Abraham Ortelius, (1527 - 1598) Antwerp, comes from an Augsburg family and was born in Antwerp, Spain, where he lived throughout his life. After thorough training, he joined the Antwerp Guild of St. Luke in 1547 as a card painter. In 1554 he took over an antiquarian bookshop that mainly deals with the coloring, distribution and publishing of maps. Basically he is more of a publisher than a scholar. And so he also made the acquaintance of another great man of his time, Gerhard Mercator (1512-1594), who encouraged him to draw cards and to make maps of the most varied of countries. His first cartographic work of his own is a large 8-sheet map of the world that appears in Antwerp in 1564. This is followed by a two-sheet map of Egypt (1565) and another of Asia (1567). The great achievement of Ortelius, who was one of the most famous European cartographers of his time, and the enthusiastic reception of his theater, mark a decisive turning point in the history of the world map. The new path is mapped out with the Theatrum. For the general view of the world, the appearance of Ortelius-Theatrum is important insofar as it emphatically confirms that America is a completely independent continent, which is also not connected to the Asian mainland mass at its northern tip. Ortelius was the first to come up with the idea of ​​producing a handy collection of reliable maps, all kept in the same format and only by the same author for each country. These sheets could also be bound into a book for easy storage and use. Mercator, who also realized the idea of ​​a world atlas from 1569, persuaded his friend to publish the famous Theatrum Orbis Terrarrum. Ortelius collected, traveled, corresponded and negotiated for 10 years before he could have his work printed in the best European printing house (Plantijn / Amsterdam). In addition to technical difficulties, Ortelius had to submit to the political / religious conditions, since maps were also subject to strict scrutiny during the Inquisition. Biblical scenes are pleasant, portraits of outstanding Catholics are welcome, but not family coats of arms or other emblems that could be politically suspect. On May 20, 1570, his first edition of the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, the first collection of maps in book form, was published, financed and edited by Gillis Hooftman, an Antwerp merchant, banker and shipowner. Atlases did not yet have this name at that time. This collection was published between 1570 and 1612 in 42 editions and in 7 languages: Latin, German, Dutch, French, Spanish, English and Italian. Unlike his professional colleagues, he clearly referenced the sources of his maps and texts. The work contains, among other things, an illustration of the world known until 1492 and was therefore already looking back at the time the map was created.
Title Moraviae Qua Olim Marcomannorum Sedes, Corographia , A.D.Paulo Fabritio Medico et Mathematico Descripta….
Year ca. 1595
Description Map shows total Moravia
Moravia developed on both sides of the Amber Road in prehistoric times. Around 60 BC The Celtic Boier withdrew from the area and were replaced by Germanic Marcomanni and Quadi, who moved on to the Alpine foothills around 550 AD together with the Rugians. Today's Moravia was still independent for a short time after the devastating defeat against the Hungarians and came under Bohemian sovereignty around 955. After being ruled briefly by Poland's ruler Boleslaw Chrobry from 999 to 1019, Moravia finally became Bohemian in 1031. The Principality and later Kingdom of Bohemia was ruled by the Přemyslid dynasty until it died out in the male line in 1305. Moravian history has been parallel to the history of Bohemia almost continuously since 1031. After the Přemyslids died out, the kingdom was ruled by the House of Luxembourg until 1437. The Přemyslid and Luxembourg dynasties also included the Moravian margraves, so u. a. the later King Ottokar II. Přemysl, the later King and Emperor Charles IV. and his nephew, the largely independent Margrave Jobst of Moravia. In 1469, the Hungarian King Matthias Corvinus advanced with his armed forces to Moravia to overthrow his father-in-law Georg von Podiebrad, whose daughter Katharina he married in 1461, as King of Bohemia. Matthias could never conquer the actual Bohemia, his rule only extended over the Bohemian neighboring countries Moravia, Silesia (with Breslau), Upper and Lower Lusatia. Nevertheless, he called himself King of Bohemia from 1469 and was crowned in 1471. As early as 1526, one of the first communities of property of the radical Reformation Anabaptist movement was formed around Balthasar Hubmaier in the Nikolsburg area. The impending dissolution of the Anabaptist community after the execution of Hubmaier in 1528 was prevented by Jakob Hutter, who came from Tyrol. The Anabaptists were also called the Hutterite Brothers after him. During the Catholic Reform and Recatholization, which were carried out by the Jesuits in particular, many churches were able to be consecrated Catholic again. The capital of Moravia and the seat of the margraves was the centrally located Olomouc from the rule of the Luxembourgers until 1641. After that, the larger Brno became the capital of the country. As the margraviate of Moravia, it formed its own crown land in the Austrian Empire and, from 1867, in the western half of Austria-Hungary. After Hungary left the empire and the real union Austria-Hungary was created in 1867, the remaining crown lands were officially referred to as Cisleithania or the kingdoms and countries represented in the Imperial Council.
Place of Publication Antwerp
Dimensions (cm)36 x 47
ConditionVery good
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueCopper print

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