Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Lutetia Parisiorum urbs, Toto Orbe Celeberrima Nossimaque Caput regni Franciae

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Article ID EUF1544
Artist Münster (1489-1552)
Sebastian Münster (1488 – 1552) belongs to the very important Comographers of the Renaicance. He issued his first famous Cosmographia in 1544 with 24 double paged maps with German description of the world. It had numerous editions in different languages including Latin, French, Italian, English, and Czech. The last German edition was published in 1628, long after his death. The Cosmographia was one of the most successful and popular books of the 16th century. It passed through 24 editions in 100 years. This success was due to the notable woodcuts , some by Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Deutsch, and David Kandel. It was most important in reviving geography in 16th-century Europe. His first geographic works were Germania descriptio (1530) and Mappa Europae (1536). In 1540 he published a Latin edition of Ptolemy's Geographia with illustrations. The 1550 edition contains cities, portraits, and costumes. These editions, printed in Germany, are the most valued of the Cosmographias.
Title Lutetia Parisiorum urbs, Toto Orbe Celeberrima Nossimaque Caput regni Franciae
Year ca. 1550
Description
Map shows the city of Paris as bird´s eye view.

History of Paris: By the end of the 12th century, Paris had become the political, economic, religious, and cultural capital of France. During the French Wars of Religion, Paris was a stronghold of the Catholic League. In August 1572, was the site of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, when thousands of French Protestants were killed. The last of these wars, the eighth one, ended in 1594, after Henri IV had converted to Catholicism. In the 17th century, Cardinal Richelieu, chief minister of Louis XIII, was determined to make Paris the most beautiful city in Europe. He built five new bridges, a new chapel for the College of Sorbonne, and a palace for himself, the Palais Cardinal, which he bequeathed to Louis XIII, and which became, after his own death in 1642, the Palais-Royal. Louis XIV distrusted the Parisians and moved his court to Versailles in 1682, but his reign also saw an unprecedented flourishing of the arts and sciences in Paris. In the summer of 1789, Paris became the centre stage of the French Revolution. On 14 July, a mob seized the arsenal at the Invalides, acquiring thousands of guns, and stormed the Bastille, a symbol of royal authority. In 1793, as the revolution turned more and more radical, the king, queen, and the mayor were guillotined, along with more than 16,000 others (throughout France), during the Reign of Terror.The property of the aristocracy and the church was nationalised, and the city's churches were closed, sold or demolished.A succession of revolutionary factions ruled Paris until 9 November 1799 when Napoléon Bonaparte seized power as First Consul. Bonaparte replaced the elected government of Paris with a prefect reporting only to him. He began erecting monuments to military glory, including the Arc de Triomphe. During the Franco-Prussian War (1870–1871), Paris was besieged by the Prussian army. After months of blockade, hunger, and then bombardment by the Prussians, the city was forced to surrender in January 1871. In March, a revolutionary government called the Paris Commune seized power in Paris. The Commune held power for two months, until it was harshly suppressed by the French army during the "Bloody Week" at the end of May 1871.
Place of Publication Basle
Dimensions (cm)26,5 x 35,5
ConditionCenterfold, some perfectly retorations
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueWoodcut

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