Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Die Statt Fulda in der Büchen/auch das Fürstlich Closter/zimlicher massen / Erdfurt die Hauptstatt in Thüringen nach eusserlichem ansehen

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Article ID EUD4350
Artist Münster (1489-1552)
Sebastian Münster (1488 – 1552) belongs to the very important Comographers of the Renaicance. He issued his first famous Cosmographia in 1544 with 24 double paged maps with German description of the world. It had numerous editions in different languages including Latin, French, Italian, English, and Czech. The last German edition was published in 1628, long after his death. The Cosmographia was one of the most successful and popular books of the 16th century. It passed through 24 editions in 100 years. This success was due to the notable woodcuts , some by Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Deutsch, and David Kandel. It was most important in reviving geography in 16th-century Europe. His first geographic works were Germania descriptio (1530) and Mappa Europae (1536). In 1540 he published a Latin edition of Ptolemy's Geographia with illustrations. The 1550 edition contains cities, portraits, and costumes. These editions, printed in Germany, are the most valued of the Cosmographias.
Title Die Statt Fulda in der Büchen/auch das Fürstlich Closter/zimlicher massen / Erdfurt die Hauptstatt in Thüringen nach eusserlichem ansehen
Year ca. 1550
Description
Two views on one sheet. Above: View of the state capital Erfurt in the Free State of Thuringia with the Erfurt Cathedral, the Severikirche and two coats of arms. Below the general view of the city of Fulda in Hesse with the cathedral of St. Salvator.

On the back map of the Thuringian landscape and the Thuringian coat of arms

.In the 12th century, Hessengau was passed to Thuringia. In the War of the Thuringian Succession (1247–1264), Hesse gained independence and became a Landgraviate within the Holy Roman Empire. It shortly rose to primary importance under Landgrave Philip the Magnanimous, who was one of the leaders of German Protestantism. After Philip's death in 1567, the territory was divided among his four sons from his first marriage into four lines: Hesse-Kassel (or Hesse-Cassel), Hesse-Darmstadt, Hesse-Rheinfels, and the also previously existing Hesse-Marburg. As the latter two lines died out quite soon (1583 and 1605), Hesse-Kassel and Hesse-Darmstadt were the two core states within the Hessian lands. Several collateral lines split off during the centuries, such as in 1622, when Hesse-Homburg split off from Hesse-Darmstadt. In the late 16th century, Kassel adopted Calvinism, while Darmstadt remained Lutheran and subsequently the two lines often found themselves on different sides of a conflict, most notably in the disputes over Hesse-Marburg and in the Thirty Years' War, when Darmstadt fought on the side of the Emperor, while Kassel sided with Sweden and France. The Landgrave Frederick II (1720–1785) ruled as a benevolent despot, from 1760 to 1785. He combined Enlightenment ideas with Christian values, cameralist plans for central control of the economy, and a militaristic approach toward diplomacy.He funded the depleted treasury of the poor nation by loaning 19,000 soldiers in complete military formations to Great Britainto fight in North America during the American Revolutionary War, 1776–1783. These soldiers, commonly known as Hessians, fought under the British flag. The British used the Hessians in several conflicts, including in the Irish Rebellion of 1798. For further revenue, the soldiers were loaned to other places as well. Most were conscripted, with their pay going to the Landgrave.
Place of Publication Basle
Dimensions (cm)28 x 36,5 cm
ConditionPerfect condition
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueWoodcut

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