Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Caucasus & Crimea with the northern portins of the Black & Caspian seas

  • Translation

Article ID EUO2505
Artist Swanston
Title Caucasus & Crimea with the northern portins of the Black & Caspian seas
Year ca. 1840
Description Map shows on two inset maps the island peninsula Krim and the Caucasus with the Black- and the Caspian sea, with beautiful representation of inhabitans, animals and landscape, with total view and bay of Sebastopol
Neanderthal settlement in Ukraine is seen in the Molodova archaeological sites, which include a mammoth bone dwelling. The territory is also considered to be the likely location for the human domestication of the horse. In the mid-14th century, upon the death of Bolesław Jerzy II of Mazovia, king Casimir III of Poland initiated campaigns (1340–1366) to take Galicia-Volhynia. Meanwhile, the heartland of Rus', including Kiev, became the territory of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, ruled by Gediminas and his successors, after the Battle on the Irpen' River. In 1648, Bohdan Khmelnytsky and Petro Doroshenko led the largest of the Cossack uprisings against the Commonwealth and the Polish king John II Casimir. After Khmelnytsky made an entry into Kiev in 1648, where he was hailed liberator of the people from Polish captivity, he founded the Cossack Hetmanate which existed until 1764. In 1657–1686 came "The Ruin", a devastating 30-year war amongst Russia, Poland, Turks and Cossacks for control of Ukraine. In 1709, Cossack Hetman Ivan Mazepa (1639–1709) defected to Sweden against Russia in the Great Northern War (1700–1721). Lithuanians and Poles controlled vast estates in Ukraine, and were a law unto themselves. After the Annexation of Crimea by the Russian Empire in 1783, New Russia was settled by Ukrainians and Russians.
Dimensions (cm)45 x 31
ConditionVery good
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueLithography

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