Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Carte de l´Europe

  • Translation

Article ID EUX1784
Artist Fer, de (1646-1720)
Nicolas de Fer ( 1646 - 1720 in Paris) was a French cartographer and geographer. He also was an engraver and publisher. De Fer was the youngest of three sons of Antoine de Fer, who was also a cartographer. When he was 12, he became the apprentice of Parisian engraver Louis Spirinx, and made his first map, of the Canal du Midi, at the age of 23. After the death of his father in June 1673, de Fer was so successful at improving the firm that, in 1690, he became the official geographer to Louis, Dauphin of France. With support from the Spanish and French Royal Families, de Fer also became official geographer for Philip V and Louis XIV, the kings of Spain and France, respectively. Because of this, his maps became Bourbon propaganda, endorsing French King Louis XIV. His business flourished, producing town plans, atlases, wall maps, and more than 600 sheet maps.He made maps of places in Europe and North America, including New Spain, places fortified by Vauban, the Low Countries, and the War of the Spanish Succession. In 1698, de Fer published a map of North America, which included a depiction of beavers building dams near Niagara Falls. Seventeen years later, Herman Moll published an identical map as his own, known as the -Beaver map-. De Fer became the official geographer for His Catholic Majesty in 1720.Two of his sons-in-law, Guillaume Danet and Jaques-François Bénard, continued the company after de Fer's death on 25 October of that year until around 1760.
Title Carte de l´Europe
Year dated 1634
Description Map shows total Europe
Especially the Greek culture, the Roman Empire and Christianity left their mark until today. In ancient times, the Roman Empire at the time of Augustus united for the first time the entire southern Europe together with the other coastal countries of the Mediterranean in one great empire. In the Roman Empire, the new religion of Christianity was able to spread rapidly. In the early Middle Ages, the Paderborn Epic declared the ruler of the Frankish Empire, Charlemagne, to be the "Father of Europe." The Middle Ages were marked, among other things, by competition between the new Roman emperor in the West and the Byzantine emperor in Constantinople, in the East, to whose two spheres of influence the later deepened division into a Western and Eastern Europe can be traced. Since the 15th century, European nations (especially Spain, Portugal, Russia, the Netherlands, France, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland) built colonial empires with large possessions on all other continents. Europe is the continent that has influenced the other continents the most, for example, through Christian missionary work, colonies, slave trade, exchange of goods and culture. n the 18th century, the Enlightenment movement set new directions and demanded tolerance, respect for human dignity, equality and freedom. In France, the French Revolution brought the bourgeoisie to power in 1789. In the early 19th century, half of Europe had to conform to the will of Napoleon, the French emperor who came to power after the revolutionary period, until he suffered a fiasco in Russia in 1812. The conservative victorious powers then tried to restore pre-revolutionary conditions at the Congress of Vienna, which succeeded only temporarily. Industrialization began in parts of Europe in the 18th century and rapidly changed the everyday lives of broad sections of the population.
Place of Publication Paris
Dimensions (cm)23,5 x 27,5
ConditionVery good
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueCopper print

Reproduction:

37.50 €

( A reproduction can be ordered individually on request. )