Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Atlas general, civil, ecclesiastique et militaire methodique et elementaire pour l´etude de la geographie et l´Histoire…………

  • Translation

Article ID T0053
Artist Desnos (1725-1805)
Louis-Charles Desnos (1725 - 1805) was both a globe maker and publisher of maps. In the former capacity he was appointed globe maker to the King of Denmark but spent most of his life working in Paris. Louis Charles Desnos and Claude Buy de Mornas worked together in the same establishments and issued together "La Manniere de Reconnoitre les Principales Etoiles dans le Ciel" (The Manner of Recognizing the Principal Stars in the Sky) in 1761.
Title Atlas general, civil, ecclesiastique et militaire methodique et elementaire pour l´etude de la geographie et l´Histoire…………
Year dated 1786
Description Titlepage from the atlas " Générale "
The title page is one of the most important parts of the "front matter" or "preliminaries" of a book, as the data on it and its verso (together known as the "title leaf") are used to establish the "title proper and usually, though not necessarily, the statement of responsibility and the data relating to publication".This determines the way the book is cited in library catalogs and academic references. The title page often shows the title of the work, the person or body responsible for its intellectual content, and the imprint, which contains the name and address of the book's publisher and its date of publication. Particularly in paperback editions it may contain a shorter title than the cover or lack a descriptive subtitle. Further information about the publication of the book, including its copyright information, is frequently printed on the verso of the title page. The first printed books, or incunabula, did not have title pages: the text simply begins on the first page, and the book is often identified by the initial words—the incipit—of the text proper. Maps were usually published in atlases. And atlases were books with titles. And, again, titles were individual pieces of art. A publisher emphazised the importance of a book he published with a spectacular entrée. Usually the pictures of an atlas title page pertained in general to the subject matter: Measuring instruments, mythologigal, astronomical, religious, scientific, allegorical hints and facts were united in a composition which depicted the pride of progress in knowledge. An atlas title page often is just one superb artistic and jubilant cartouche.
Place of Publication Paris
Dimensions (cm)28 x 31
ConditionVery good
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueCopper print

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