Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

A new and accurate map of the south west part of Germany

  • Translation

Article ID EUD2394
Artist Bowen (1720-1767)
Emanuel Bowen (1714- 1767 in London) was an English map engraver, who worked for George II of England and Louis XV of France as a geographer. In spite of his royal appointments and apparent prosperity he died in poverty and his son, who carried on the business was no more fortunate and died in a Clerkenwell workhouse in 1790.
Title A new and accurate map of the south west part of Germany
Year ca. 1750
Description Map shows the southwest part of Germany with Baden Würtemberg and partly Bavaria, on iset map a city map of Breisach
Baden-Wuertemberg is a state in southwest Germany, east of the Rhine, which forms the border with France. It is is formed from the historical territories of Baden, Prussian Hohenzollern, and Württemberg, and also parts of Swabia. Baden Würtemberg was only founded in 1952 by the merger of the states of Württemberg-Baden, Baden and Württemberg-Hohenzollern. Today the most populous city of Baden-Württemberg is the state capital Stuttgart, followed by Karlsruhe and Mannheim. Other major cities are Freiburg im Breisgau, Heidelberg, Ulm, Heilbronn, Pforzheim and Reutlingen. The early modern period was marked by the Reformation and the expansion efforts of the emerging states of Austria, Prussia, France and Sweden. Conflicts such as the Peasant War, the Thirty Years' War and the Palatinate War of Succession resulted from these. One of the focal points of the fighting, with corresponding consequences for the population and the economy, was in what is today Baden-Württemberg, which remained extremely fragmented territorially. At the beginning of the 19th century, around 300 states still had territorial rights in what is now Baden-Württemberg, but their number was reduced to four after the dissolution of the Old Empire. The Kingdom of Württemberg and the Grand Duchy of Baden were among the winners of the coalition wars. The two principalities of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen and Hohenzollern-Hechingen survived mediatization due to their special relationship with Napoléon. In 1849, the Baden Revolution was put down by Prussian intervention forces, the Baden army was dissolved and rebuilt under Prussian leadership. In 1850 the two Hohenzollern states became the Prussian province of Hohenzollernsche Lande. With the new formation of the tribal duchies, the southern areas of what is now the state of Baden-Württemberg belonged to the Duchy of Swabia until the end of the High Middle Ages, the northern areas were located with the Duchy of Franconia.
Place of Publication London
Dimensions (cm)32,5 x 23
ConditionVery good
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueCopper print

Reproduction:

39.00 €

( A reproduction can be ordered individually on request. )