Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Tabula exatissima Regnorum Sueciae et Norvegiae, nec non Maris universi orientalis….

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Article ID EUS1760
Artist Goos (1590-1643)
Abraham Goos (1590–1643), was a cartographer and map seller. He has published numerous globes, land and sea maps together with Jodocus Hondius and Johannes Janssonius in Antwerp. From 1666, Pieter Goos, his son, also published a number of well produced atlases. He was the first to map Christmas Island, which he labelled ""Mony"" in his map of the East Indies, published in his 1666 Zee-Atlas (Sea Atlas). His Atlas ofte Water-Weereld (Atlas or Water World) has been cited as one of the best maritime atlases of its time. Another of his fine works was the Oost Indien (East Indies) map published in 1680. Pilot books, which contained a large number of navigation charts, were published by many authors, including Goos. He had a notarized agreement with two others, Jacob Lootsman and Hendrick Doncker, to publish pilot books for navigation along the Mediterranean coast, also covering easterly and westerly navigational routes. These were called the Dutch pilot books and remained valid for the period from 1643 to 1680. Goos was also instrumental in publishing the first pilot book for coastlines outside Europe. A further improvement over the pilot books in Dutch cartography was the publication of sea atlases covering the whole world. Initiated in 1659 by Doncker, the approach was also adopted by Goos from 1666. One of his larger works is named le grand & nouveau miroir ou flambeau de la mer (1662).In the same year, Goos published -The Lighting Colomne or Sea-Mirrour-, which not only contained nautical charts, but also -a brief instruction of the art of navigation-. The maps of Goos and Gerard van Kuelen were used exclusively during the eighteenth century until 1740. They were, however, found to have deficiencies such as the location of sandbars, grand banks and islands in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with inaccuracies of as much as 44 leagues on the reduced Goos maps. Goos' famous world map titled Atlas ofte Water-Weereld was in two parts, one for each hemisphere. The colourful presentation included the two poles. His maritime maps encompassed not only Europe, Great Britain and Ireland but also the two poles.
Title Tabula exatissima Regnorum Sueciae et Norvegiae, nec non Maris universi orientalis….
Year ca. 1620
Description
Map shows Fennoscandia is the geographical peninsula of the Scandinavian Peninsula (Norway, Sweden, Denmark), Finland, Karelia, the Kola Peninsula and with a beautiful heraldic cartouche.

Scandinavia characterized by common ethnocultural North Germanic heritage and mutually intelligible North Germanic languages The term Scandinavia in local usage covers the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, but in English usage, it also sometimes refers to the Scandinavian Peninsula or to the broader region which includes Finland and Iceland This broader region is usually known locally as the Nordic countries. The remote
Map shows the whole of Scandinavia with Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Livonia (today Latvia and Estonia) and a magnificent title cartouche
Norwegian islands of Svalbard and Jan Mayen are usually not seen as a part of Scandinavia, nor is Greenland, a constituent country within the Kingdom of Denmark. The Faroe Islands may be included. For more than 500 years there was a common ground in the field of foreign policy, from the attack by the Danish king Chlochilaicus on Gaul (517) to the unfortunate move by Harald Hardrades against England in 1066, the Vikings carried out their raids and raids on all European coastal areas, but also deep into Russia stretch. For a long time, another commonality was the rejection of Christianity in times when it had been common in Western Europe for centuries. In addition, the great importance of the Jarle, who were initially only leaders of raids, but as such became very rich and powerful, is characteristic of this period. For this reason, fiefdom in Scandinavia developed much more slowly than in core Europe, and serfdom did not become fully established. In addition to these general similarities, there were also times when several of the Scandinavian countries were united under one rule, such as Denmark, Norway and (more relaxed) Sweden as well as England under Knut the Great from 1028 to 1035, as well as England. Denmark and Norway were soon under the common rule of Magnus the Good from 1042 to 1046. But the main time of the common political development lies in the Kalmar Union, which the countries of Denmark, Norway and Sweden were linked from 1397 to 1523. During this period, Norway lost significant political independence, so that after Sweden left the Kalmar Union with the Danish-Norwegian personal union, there was practically Danish dominance until 1814, which was replaced in 1814 by the Swedish-Norwegian union, which continued until 1905.
Place of Publication Amsterdam
Dimensions (cm)46 x 55
ConditionMounted
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueCopper print

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