Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Africae, described the manners of their Habits…

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Article ID AF010
Artist Goos (1590-1643)
Abraham Goos (1590–1643), was a cartographer and map seller. He has published numerous globes, land and sea maps together with Jodocus Hondius and Johannes Janssonius in Antwerp. From 1666, Pieter Goos, his son, also published a number of well produced atlases. He was the first to map Christmas Island, which he labelled ""Mony"" in his map of the East Indies, published in his 1666 Zee-Atlas (Sea Atlas). His Atlas ofte Water-Weereld (Atlas or Water World) has been cited as one of the best maritime atlases of its time. Another of his fine works was the Oost Indien (East Indies) map published in 1680. Pilot books, which contained a large number of navigation charts, were published by many authors, including Goos. He had a notarized agreement with two others, Jacob Lootsman and Hendrick Doncker, to publish pilot books for navigation along the Mediterranean coast, also covering easterly and westerly navigational routes. These were called the Dutch pilot books and remained valid for the period from 1643 to 1680. Goos was also instrumental in publishing the first pilot book for coastlines outside Europe. A further improvement over the pilot books in Dutch cartography was the publication of sea atlases covering the whole world. Initiated in 1659 by Doncker, the approach was also adopted by Goos from 1666. One of his larger works is named le grand & nouveau miroir ou flambeau de la mer (1662).In the same year, Goos published -The Lighting Colomne or Sea-Mirrour-, which not only contained nautical charts, but also -a brief instruction of the art of navigation-. The maps of Goos and Gerard van Kuelen were used exclusively during the eighteenth century until 1740. They were, however, found to have deficiencies such as the location of sandbars, grand banks and islands in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with inaccuracies of as much as 44 leagues on the reduced Goos maps. Goos' famous world map titled Atlas ofte Water-Weereld was in two parts, one for each hemisphere. The colourful presentation included the two poles. His maritime maps encompassed not only Europe, Great Britain and Ireland but also the two poles.
Title Africae, described the manners of their Habits…
Year ca. 1627
Description Map of total Africa with desorative side panels. 8 views of important cities of the contienent on the upper margin, 10 pictures on the left and right side of the map showin the inhabitans of the continent. Issued from Abrahem Goose after John Speed.
According to the "Out-of-Africa theory", Africa is considered the "cradle of mankind", where homo development led to the development of the anatomically modern human Homo sapiens. One of the earliest advanced civilizations in mankind was formed in ancient Egypt. Over the millennia, various "great empires" such as the Empire of Abyssinia emerged on the continent. There were other kingdoms in West Africa, such as the Ashanti and Haussa, but they emerged much later. There were also some important cultures in East and South Africa, as in the area of today's Sudan, then called Nubia or Kush. Nubian pharaohs ruled all of Egypt for a dynasty. For example, the inhabitants of Greater Zimbabwe were important cultures in southern Africa. This stone castle was architecturally a masterpiece at that time and important for trade between the peoples of the south and east. The Swahili were known in East Africa. North Africa was connected to Europe and the Near East by the Mediterranean rather than separated. Carthage, a foundation of the Phoenicians in what is now Tunisia, was around the middle of the 1st millennium BC. The dominant power in the western Mediterranean until it was replaced by Rome in the Punic Wars. This prevailed from 30 BC. BC (conquest of Egypt) over all of North Africa. Even the ancient Egyptians (Queen Hatshepsut) made trips to Punt, probably in what is now Somalia. The kingdom of the Queen of Sheba, which probably had its center in southern Arabia, is said to have spanned parts of the Horn from Africa to the north of Ethiopia.
Place of Publication London
Dimensions (cm)40 x 52
ConditionSome restorations
Coloringcolored
TechniqueCopper print

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525.00 €

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