Adina Sommer`s Rare Antique Maps and Contemporary Art

Partie Occidentale de la Carte des Anciennes Monarchies. / Partie Orientale de la Carte des Anciennes Monarchies.

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Original:

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Article ID EUX3656
Artist Vaugondy, de (1723-1786)
Didier Robert de Vaugondy (1723 -1786) also known as Le Sieur or Monsieur Robert, and his son, were leading cartographers in France during the 18th century. In 1757, Gilles and Didier Robert De Vaugondy published The Atlas Universel, one of the most important atlases of the 18th century. To produce the atlas, the Vaugondys integrated older sources with more modern surveyed maps. They verified and corrected the latitude and longitude of many regional maps in the atlas with astronomical observations. The older material was revised with the addition of many new place names. In 1760, Didier Robert de Vaugondy was appointed geographer to Louis XV. Gilles and Didier Robert De Vaugondy produced their maps and terrestrial globes working together as father and son. Globes of a variety of sizes were made by gluing copperplate-printed gores on a plaster-finished papier-mache core, a complicated and expensive manufacturing process, employing several specialists. In some cases it is uncertain whether Gilles or Didier made a given map. Gilles often signed maps as M.Robert, while Didier commonly signed his maps as ""Robert de Vaugondy"", or added ""fils"" or ""filio"" after his name. The Robert de Vaugondys were descended from the Nicolas Sanson family through Sanson's grandson, Pierre Moulard-Sanson. From him, they inherited much of Sanson's cartographic material, which they combined with maps and plates acquired after Hubert Jaillot's death in 1712 to form the basis the Atlas Universel.
Title Partie Occidentale de la Carte des Anciennes Monarchies. / Partie Orientale de la Carte des Anciennes Monarchies.
Year d 1737
Description
Map shows the total Roman Empire in Europe ( eastern and western part) with parts of Asia and Africa and the Middle East. With two inset maps: the old world ( Asia, Afica and Europe) and Greece. Decorative title cartouche and detailed mountains and rivers. Ancient Rome was originally an Italic settlement dating from the 8th century BC that grew into the city of Rome and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed. The Roman empire expanded to become one of the largest empires in the ancient world. After defeating the Macedonian and Seleucid Empires in the 2nd century BC, the Romans became the dominant people of the Mediterranean Sea.
 
The Roman Empire was one of the largest in history, with contiguous territories throughout Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. In reality, Roman expansion was mostly accomplished under the Republic, though parts of northern Europe were conquered in the 1st century AD, when Roman control in Europe, Africa and Asia was strengthened. During the reign of Augustus, a "global map of the known world" was displayed for the first time in public at Rome, coinciding with the composition of the most comprehensive work on political geography that survives from antiquity, the Geography of the Pontic Greek writer Strabo. When Augustus died, the commemorative account of his achievements (Res Gestae) prominently featured the geographical cataloguing of peoples and places within the Empire. Geography, the census, and the meticulous keeping of written records were central concerns of Roman Imperial administration.
Place of Publication Paris
Dimensions (cm)50,5 x 120,5
ConditionPrinted on 2 sheets joined together,centerfolf restored
Coloringoriginal colored
TechniqueCopper print

Reproduction:

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( A reproduction can be ordered individually on request. )